The Best Sentence of the Day

This blog is a cut-up of a dissertation in progress. Each day, I will post my favorite sentence that I have newly scribed. Everything out of context, but suggestive. I hope.

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I'm a game designer, a games researcher, and a future forecaster. I make games that give a damn. I study how games change lives. I spend a lot of my time figuring out how the games we play today shape our real-world future. And so I'm trying to make sure that a game developer wins a Nobel Prize by the year 2032. Learn more here in my bio or get my contact information on my contact page.

Friday, June 16, 2006

Best Sentence #84

Why, then, go to the trouble of employing a dissimulative aesthetic if it can be discredited so quickly?

15 Comments:

Blogger Sheena said...

I like your creativity.

12:10 PM  
Blogger JohnFox said...

I laughed so hard! Oh, I had too much grad school and now sentences like that one just crack me up!!

1:29 PM  
Blogger elbeato said...

I'm dying to know the answer.

1:32 PM  
Blogger MachSirius said...

I don't suppose you could provide a little background on that sentence as with some others?

I've had no problems with the other sentences, but this one seems, well, purposely elusive.

I understand what a "dissimulative aesthetic" could be. But where does the "discredit" come in?

3:15 PM  
Blogger kevin beck said...

Hilarious!

Perhaps one should, shall we say,re-evaluate why one would utilize a paradoxical theory of the beautiful if that hypothesis may fall under the auspices of Derridean deconstructionism?

3:51 PM  
Blogger Seidl said...

I like your sentence and it makes perfect sense.:P

machsirius--if the aesthetic is dissimulative, then it can be discredited easily.

kevin beck--BS?

5:08 PM  
Blogger MachSirius said...

I understand what it means.
What I'm referring to is the concept of it in regards to e-gaming aesthetics.

It's ALL dissimulative. (Or maybe I'm missing the point. Maybe that IS the point.) The games are designed, programmed, played. It's all fake. Engineered. Without further narrative/support to that sentence, I have to say:
"dissimulative aesthetic" + "discredit" = redundant

Of course you can discredit it.

So, maybe I should restate my earlier question this way,
Can anyone give me an example of a "simulative aesthetic"- in a designed/engineered/programmed game- that can't be discredited?

5:54 PM  
Blogger Jane said...

quick note-- there is an important difference between simulative and dissimulative. most games are simulative-- realistic, immersive, etc.-- but not dissimulative-- attempting to fool or trick the user. Games that are dissimulative actively try to pass themselves off as reality so players don't realize they are playing a game, as in Richard Schechner's theory of dark play.

8:50 PM  
Blogger Mozchopz said...

Hi Jane,
You're encouraging feedback, so I'll happily oblige :) this is a general criticism, not specific to #84.
I chose to look through your blog because I expected to find some witty and profound statements, that you chose to single out for their attraction for whatever reason, but I'm disappointed that all I found were details of your games analysis that are too esoteric for just anyone to get a grip on. I worked on videogames for ten years, (I quit because the industry is not as creative as it could be), so I've absorbed and read a great deal about it's existence, more than it deserves, - I'm not being harsh, there's a lot of b#$%^&* in trade mags.
I found myself scratching my head (until the blood poured over my eyes) at your statements.
I think you prioritise clever words over your desire to communicate clearly and elegantly. It makes for painful reading when want you all you want is to get people to understand you instantly.
Thanks for listening to my little earbender, I'd like to know what you think.
Moz

4:32 AM  
Blogger MachSirius said...

Ahhh, Okay. That's all I needed. Perhaps your sentence should be modifed to include "active" or "purposeful" to make that clear.
There is, in my mind, a large difference between a game being innately dissimulative, and purposefully so.

6:07 AM  
Blogger Jane said...

Moz, sorry you don't like academic writing. I'm not writing my dissertaiton to game design professionals, although I know many who like my work. maybe you should visit terranova blogs sometime to meet some other game pro's (btw, when i'm dissertating, I'm a full-time lead designer in the game industry) who like to think in academic ways sometimes. cheers.

8:10 AM  
Blogger kevin beck said...

seidl,
yep. bs.

8:16 AM  
Blogger S7 Ghost said...

Unique blog, it’s very expansive.

3:46 PM  
Blogger Jeff_Mills said...

If salt looses its saltiness, can it be made salty again?

4:51 PM  
Blogger Yasser said...

Yes if you add some sugar :)

7:36 PM  

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